September 2021

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
 
 
 
12:30pm, GIL 484
 
Quantitative lunch -- Christof Fehrman, Introduction to Spiking Neural Networks.
Quantitative lunch -- Christof Fehrman, Introduction to Spiking Neural Networks. 12:30pm, Mill 123 and Zoom

Spiking neural networks (SNNs) are an artificial neural network architecture that has gained popularity in recent years. These networks are more biologically plausible than traditional network architectures in that each unit produces a temporally precise ‘spike’, similar to the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. This talk will provide an introduction in how to construct and analyze SNNs as well as their use as a research tool to both neuroscientists and quantitative researchers. Specific attention will be given to applications in computational experimentation, simulating neural activity, and tackling traditional problems in machine learning. Additionally, some basic results will be shown using the Python package Brian 2, which can simulate networks of neurons at many different levels of complexity.

12:30pm, Mill 123 and Zoom
 
 
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
 
Social lunch -- Jordan Starck (Princeton University).
Social lunch -- Jordan Starck (Princeton University). 12:30pm, Zoom

There are numerous reasons why institutions of higher education may choose to embrace diversity. A common rationale sanctioned by the U.S. Supreme Court is that diversity provides compelling educational benefits and is thus instrumentally useful. In a series of studies, we find that such instrumental rationales are the predominant rationale for diversity efforts in American higher education, are preferred by White Americans and not by Black Americans, that they are expected to advantage White Americans, and that they correspond to greater racial disparities in academic achievement. We find evidence that these racial disparities may be driven by how instrumental rationales influence White individuals’ diversity-relevant attitudes and behaviors. Overall, these findings suggest that the rationales behind universities’ embrace of diversity have non-legal consequences that should be considered in institutional decision-making.

12:30pm, Zoom
 
Developmental lunch --Dr. Philippe Rochat.
Developmental lunch --Dr. Philippe Rochat. 12:30pm, Corner Building, 1400 University Avenue and Zoom
12:30pm, Corner Building, 1400 University Avenue and Zoom
 
12:30pm, Academic Commons
 
Quantitative lunch -- Dr. Steve Boker.
Quantitative lunch -- Dr. Steve Boker. 12:30pm, Mill 123 and Zoom

OpenMx now allows the estimation of structural equation models that include products of variables; both manifest and latent. While the definition variable method has been used to include products of manifest variables for more than 20 years, the inclusion of products of latent variables has been a recent development. There are some identification issues to pay attention to, but with sensible constraints, these can be overcome. A large simulation shows that parameter point estimates for products of variables are unbiased. Also, normal theory standard errors have expected coverage unless the model is using the products of variables to estimate multilevel structure. Multilevel standard errors for products of variables are, as yet, an open problem.

12:30pm, Mill 123 and Zoom
 
 
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
 
 
 
 
 
2021-22 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series co-sponsors Youth-NEX Panel
2021-22 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series co-sponsors Youth-NEX Panel 12:00-1:00pm

Friday September 17th from 12-1 PM EST 

Understanding the Well-Being of LGBTQI+ Populations

Panelists: · Dr. Charlotte Patterson, University of Virginia (moderator) · Dr. Andrew R. Flores, American University · Dr. Stephen T. Russell, The University of Texas at Austin · Dr. Tonia Poteat, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This panel will be discussing the recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine consensus study report that identifies the need for heightened attention to the social and structural inequities that exist for LGBTQI+ people and argues for new research on the full range of sexual and gender diversity. Read more about this report in this Youth-Nex blog post.

Following this panel discussion will be small group discussion for graduate students from 1:15-2 PM EST! If you are an interested student, please register online.

More info including the zoom link can be found here.

12:00-1:00pm
 
 
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26
27
28
29
30
1
2