Social Psychology

The faculty and students in social psychology are collaboratively engaged in a wide range of cutting-edge research on topics including the following:

Affect and Social Cognition, including the study of affective forecasting, the adaptive unconscious, and the effect of cognitive reframing on people’s ability to cope and perform.

Social Emotion, including studies of affective influences on how people perceive, think, and remember, and whether they tend to see the forest or the trees.

Social Neuroscience, including the dynamics of gene expression and imaging studies of the neural basis of social and nonsocial action perception.

Judgment and Decision-Making, considering the interplay of social, emotional, intuitive, and motivational factors.

Self Regulation, including how people choose, initiate, and balance their many (often competing) goals in life.

Law and Psychology, including judgment and decision-making in judges and juries and differences between law and psychology in evidence and reasoning.

Values versus Practices, including the gap between intentions and behavior, and the role of implicit cognition in social behavior and judgment.

Research Methods, including projects aimed at enabling social psychologists to optimize social psychologists use of on-line data collection and projects focused on assessing and improving research and reporting practices in social psychology.

Cultural Psychology, including how differences in residential mobility affect the psychology of individuals and societies.

Subjective Well-Being and studies of what makes people understood by others.

Applicants to social psychology are admitted to the area and not to specific labs. The expectation is that they will work with more than one faculty member during their graduate career. All faculty are open to working with graduate students, including Gerald Clore, Benjamin Converse, Ed Diener, James Morris, Brian Nosek, Shigehiro Oishi, Sophie Trawalter, and Timothy Wilson. That said, graduate students do have primary advisers.

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