Recommendations for a Sequence of Developmental Psychology Courses

(updated September 6, 2017)

The curriculum for the Psychology Major includes courses that concentrate on developmental psychology, including infant, child, adolescent, and lifespan development. The field of Developmental Psychology draws from all of the other sub-fields of Psychology, such as Cognitive, Social, Neuroscience, etc., and makes use of all of their techniques. We strongly recommend that students participate in undergraduate research experiences whenever possible.

Potential career paths of Psychology majors who pursue coursework in developmental psychology include: Psychologist (Clinical, Counseling, Forensic, School, and others); Researcher (Academic and non-academic); Health (pediatrician, nurse, physician assistant, OT, PT, pharmacist, dentist, and others); Education (teacher, special educator, administrator, school psychologist, speech therapist, OT, and others); Social Work; Law; Child and Family Policy; and others.

The list of courses, and the 4-year sequence of enrollment below are provided as guidance. While some courses are taught almost every year, others are offered less frequently. In addition to the core developmental psychology courses, there are a number of related courses that might be relevant to those with specific interest in developmental psychology, and these are also listed below.

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REQUIREMENTS for PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR

To earn a BA in Psychology (detail at http://psychology.as.virginia.edu/undergraduate-handbook), students must complete 30 credits in PSYC courses, including at least one course from Introductory courses in Groups I, II and III, Research Methods (PSYC 3005 and PSYC3006), 2 courses at the 3000-level or higher (including 1 at the 4000- or 5000-level). The remainder of credits can be completed by enrolling to any other PSYC courses.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

(These may also satisfy the Introductory Course requirements for the Major.):

PSYC 2700  Introduction to Child Psychology (possibly including 1-unit discussion)

MID-LEVEL COURSES:

At least one is recommended.

PSYC 3235  Introduction to Epigenetics

PSYC 3435  Educational Psychology

PSYC 3440  Child Psychopathology

PSYC 3460  Psychological Study of Children, Families, and the Law

PSYC 3480  Adolescence: Theory and Development

PSYC 3490  Infant Development

SEMINAR COURSES:

PSYC 4130  Risk and Resilience Among Marginalized Adolescents

PSYC 4255  Behavioral Epigenetics

PSYC 4330  Topics in Child Development

PSYC 4600  Attachment and Social Development

PSYC 4604  Family Relations

PSYC 4870  The Minority Family: A Psychological Inquiry

UPPER LEVEL SEMINARS / GRADUATE COURSES:

PSYC 5305  Moral Development

PSYC 5320  Theories of Cognitive Development

PSYC 5559  The Social Brain in Infancy

ADDITIONAL COURSES RELEVANT TO DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 3485/3495  Science & Lived Experience of Autism I and II

PSYC 4105  Cognitive Psychology and American Education

PSYC 4155  Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods

PSYC 4603  Psychology of Sexual Orientation

PSYC 5328  Cognitive Aging

PSYC 5355  Neurobiology of Speech and Language

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR DEVELOPMENT TRACK

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

PSYC 2700

 

 

Groups I and II Psychology courses;

Other College Requirements

 

 

 

PSYC3005 and PSYC3006

 

 

3000-level developmental courses

 

 

 

At least one 4000-level seminar in developmental psychology

 

4000+ seminars in developmental and/or related areas

 

Research in Developmental Psychology

         

Distinguished Majors