February 2018

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
 
 
 
 
Colloquium by Barry Prizant sponsored by Psychology, UVA's Disability Studies Initiative, Curry, UVA's Brain Initiative and the College Civic & Community Engagement Initiative
Colloquium by Barry Prizant sponsored by Psychology, UVA's Disability Studies Initiative, Curry, UVA's Brain Initiative and the College Civic & Community Engagement Initiative 3:30pm, Gilmer 130

On Friday, February 2 @ 3:30 pm, Dr. Barry M. Prizant will give a free public lecture based on his book "Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism." The presentation will be held at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Seating is limited, and tickets are available on a first come, first served basis with your RSVP at this link.
Winner of the 2017 Autism Society of America’s Dr. Temple Grandin Award for the Outstanding Literary Work in Autism, Dr. Prizant is one of the world's leading experts in autism.
“A must-read for anyone touched by autism... Dr. Prizant’s Uniquely Human is a crucial step in promoting better understanding and a more humane approach” (Associated Press). Instead of classifying “autistic” behaviors as signs of pathology, Dr. Prizant sees them as part of a range of strategies to cope with a world that feels chaotic and overwhelming. Rather than curb these behaviors, it’s better to enhance abilities, build on strengths, and offer supports that will lead to more desirable behavior and a better quality of life.
The lecture will take place in 130 Gilmer Hall at 3:30 and will be followed by a reception and book signing in the Gilmer Hall Academic Commons at 5pm. Hourly parking is available across the street in the Central Grounds Garage at the University of Virginia. This event is sponsored by UVa's Disability Studies Initiative, the Curry School of Education, UVa's BRAIN Initiative, and the College Civic & Community Engagement Initiative.
To RSVP, follow the link here.

3:30pm, Gilmer 130
 
 
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
 
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Brandon Turner
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Brandon Turner 3:30pm, Gilmer 190

DEPARTMENT of PSYCHOLOGY
2017-2018 COLLOQUIUM SERIES
presents

Brandon Turner
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology
The Ohio State University

“Integrating Neural and Behavioral Measures of Cognition”

Scientists who study cognition infer underlying processes either by observing behavior (e.g., response times, percentage correct) or by observing neural activity (e.g., the BOLD response). These two types of observations have traditionally supported two separate lines of study. The first is led by cognitive modelers, who rely on behavior alone to support their computational theories. The second is led by cognitive neuroimagers, who rely on statistical models to link patterns of neural activity to experimental manipulations, often without any attempt to make a direct connection to an explicit computational theory. Here I present a flexible Bayesian framework for combining neural and cognitive models. Joining neuroimaging and computational modeling in a single hierarchical framework allows the neural data to influence the parameters of the cognitive model and allows behavioral data, even in the absence of neural data, to constrain the neural model. In the talk, I will demonstrate the advantages of this powerful framework by investigating a variety of important problems in cognitive neuroscience.

Monday, February 5, 2018
3:30 p.m.
Gilmer 190

Coffee/cookies at 3:15pm.
Reception will be held after the talk.

3:30pm, Gilmer 190
 
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Musings from Gilmer Hall by Charles Ebersole, Veronica Weser and Jason Sumontha
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Musings from Gilmer Hall by Charles Ebersole, Veronica Weser and Jason Sumontha 3:30pm, Gilmer 190

DEPARTMENT of PSYCHOLOGY
2017-2018 COLLOQUIUM SERIES
presents

Musings from Gilmer Hall

Veronica Weser
Cognitive Area Graduate Student
“Making the Visual Tangible:
A Virtual Size-Weight Illusion”

Charlie Ebersole
Social Area Graduate Student
“Investigating Time-of-Semester Variation or:
How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Participant Pool”

Jason Sumontha
Community Area Graduate Student
“Socioeconomic Status and Family Formation
Among Gay Fathers”

Friday, February 9, 2018
3:30 p.m.
Gilmer 190

Coffee/cookies at 3:15pm.
Reception will be held after the talk.

3:30pm, Gilmer 190
 
 
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
 
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Elisabeth Karuza
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Elisabeth Karuza 3:30pm, Gilmer 190

DEPARTMENT of PSYCHOLOGY
2017-2018 COLLOQUIUM SERIES
presents

Elisabeth Karuza
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Department of Psychology
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
University of Pennsylvania

“Decoding the Ultimate Codebreaker: Statistical Learning at Work in a Complex and Changing Environment”

Learners are highly sensitive to pairwise statistical associations embedded in sensory input (e.g., what is the probability one element will follow another in time?). However, it remains an essential question how we use this information to build up complex knowledge systems (e.g., language), particularly in the face of noise or competing signals. Drawing on insights from functional neuroimaging, I will discuss the interplay between high-level association areas and sensory-specific cortex in a dynamic learning context. I will show that prefrontal cortex, a slow-to-mature area associated with cognitive control, underpins sequential pattern learning in adults, raising the possibility that they recruit a sub-optimal learning system relative to children. Through a series of behavioral experiments, I will then demonstrate that tools from network science offer a novel and largely untapped means of probing how learners scale up pairwise associations to gain knowledge of broad-scale patterns in their environment.

Monday, February 12, 2018
3:30 p.m.
Gilmer 190

Coffee/cookies at 3:15pm.
Reception will be held after the talk.

3:30pm, Gilmer 190
 
 
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
 
 
25
26
27
28
1
2
3
 
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Anna Schapiro
2017-18 Department of Psychology Colloquium Series - Anna Schapiro 3:30pm, Gilmer 190

DEPARTMENT of PSYCHOLOGY
2017-2018 COLLOQUIUM SERIES
presents

Anna Schapiro
Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Psychology
Harvard Medical School

“Learning and Consolidating Patterns in Experience”

There is a fundamental tension between storing discrete traces of individual experiences, which allows recall of particular moments in our past without interference, and extracting regularities across these experiences, which supports generalization and prediction in similar situations in the future. This tension is resolved in classic memory systems theories by separating these processes anatomically: the hippocampus rapidly encodes individual episodes, while the cortex slowly extracts regularities over days, months, and years. This framework fails, however, to account for the full range of human learning and memory behavior, including: (1) how we often learn regularities quite quickly—within a few minutes or hours, and (2) how these memories transform over time and as a result of sleep. I will present evidence from fMRI and patient studies suggesting that the hippocampus, in addition to its well-established role in episodic memory, is in fact also responsible for our ability to rapidly extract regularities. I will then use computational modeling of the hippocampus to demonstrate how these two competing learning processes can coexist in one brain structure. Finally, I will present empirical and simulation work showing how these initial hippocampal memories are replayed during offline periods to help stabilize and integrate them into cortical networks. This work advocates a new comprehensive, mechanistic view of the remarkable mnemonic capabilities of the human mind and brain.

Monday, February 26, 2018
3:30 p.m.
Gilmer 190

Coffee/cookies at 3:15pm.
Reception will be held after the talk.

3:30pm, Gilmer 190